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Original Research

Effectiveness of a brief educational workshop intervention among primary care providers at 6 months: uptake of dental emergency supporting resources

Submitted: 10 July 2012
Revised: 13 November 2012
Accepted: 4 December 2012
Published: 27 May 2013

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Author(s) : Skapetis T, Gerzina TM, Hu W, Cameron W.

Tony SkapetisW Ian Cameron

Citation: Skapetis T, Gerzina TM, Hu W, Cameron W.  Effectiveness of a brief educational workshop intervention among primary care providers at 6 months: uptake of dental emergency supporting resources. Rural and Remote Health (Internet) 2013; 13: 2286. Available: http://www.rrh.org.au/articles/subviewnew.asp?ArticleID=2286 (Accessed 17 October 2017)

ABSTRACT

Introduction:  Dental emergencies often present to primary care providers in general practice and Emergency Departments (ED), who may be unable to manage them effectively due to limited knowledge, skills and available resources. This may impact negatively on patient outcomes. Provision of a short educational workshop intervention in the management of such emergencies, including education in supporting resources, may provide a practical strategy for assisting clinicians to provide this aspect of comprehensive primary care.
Methods:  This descriptive study used a validated questionnaire survey instrument to measure the effectiveness of a short multimodal educational intervention through the uptake and perceived usefulness of supporting resources at 6 months following the intervention. Between 2009 and 2010, 15 workshops, of which eight were for regional and rural hospital ED doctors, were conducted by the same presenter using the same educational materials and training techniques. A sample of 181 workshop participants, 63% of whom were in rural or remote practice and engaged in providing primary care medical services, returned responses at 6 months on the perceived usefulness of the dental emergencies resource.
Results:  Thirty percent of clinicians had used the dental emergencies resource within the six-month follow-up period. Significance was demonstrated between professional category and use of the resource, with emergency registrars utilising this resource most and GPs the least. The Dental Handbook, specifically designed for ED use, and tooth-filling material contained within this resource, were deemed the most useful components. There were overall positive open-ended question responses regarding the usefulness of the resource, especially when it was made available to clinicians who had attended the education workshops.
Conclusion:  Utilisation and perceived usefulness of a supporting resource at 6 months are indicators of the effectiveness of a short workshop educational intervention in the management of dental emergencies by primary care providers. This education may have greater relevance to rural and remote practice where dental services may be limited.

Key words: Australia, dental emergencies, educational resource, primary care.

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