Rural and Remote Health Journal photo
African section Asian section European section International section Latin American section North American section
home
login/register
current articles
contribute
information for authors
status/user profile
links/forums
about us

Original Research

Outdoor workers and sun protection strategies: two case study examples in Queensland, Australia

Submitted: 7 April 2015
Revised: 3 November 2015
Accepted: 17 March 2016
Published: 2 May 2016

Full text: You can view the full article, or view a printable version.
Comments: (login to access the comments on this article)

Author(s) : Sendall MC, Stoneham M, Crane P, Fleming M, Janda M, Tenkate T, Youl P, Kimlin M.

Citation: Sendall MC, Stoneham M, Crane P, Fleming M, Janda M, Tenkate T, Youl P, Kimlin M.  Outdoor workers and sun protection strategies: two case study examples in Queensland, Australia. Rural and Remote Health (Internet) 2016; 16: 3558. Available: http://www.rrh.org.au/articles/subviewnew.asp?ArticleID=3558 (Accessed 21 October 2017)

ABSTRACT

Introduction:  Outdoor workers are at risk of developing skin cancer because they are exposed to high levels of harmful ultraviolet radiation. The Outdoor Workers Sun Protection Project investigated sun protection strategies for high risk outdoor workers in rural and regional Australia.
Methods:  Fourteen workplaces (recruitment rate 37%) across four industries in rural and regional Queensland, Australia were recruited to the OWSPP. In 2011–2012, data were collected using pre- and post-intervention interviews and discussion groups. This article presents two workplaces as case study examples.
Results:  The flat organisational structure of workplace 1 supported the implementation of the Sun Safety Action Plan (SSAP), whilst the hierarchical organisational nature of workplace 2 delayed implementation of the SSAP. Neither workplace had an existing sun protection policy but both workplaces adopted one. An effect related to the researchers’ presence was seen in workplace 1 and to a lesser degree in workplace 2. Overt reciprocity was seen between management and workers in workplace 1 but this was not so evident in workplace 2. In both workplaces, the role of the workplace champion was pivotal to SSAP progression.
Conclusions:  These two case studies highlight a number of contextually bound workplace characteristics related to sun safety. These issues are (1) the structure of workplace, (2) policy, (3) an effect related to the researchers’ presence, (4) the workplace champion and (5) reciprocity. There are several recommendations from this article. Workplace health promotion strategies for sun safety need to be contextualised to individual workplaces to take advantage of the strengths of the workplace and to build capacity.

Key words: Australia, health promotion, participatory action research, skin cancer, sun protection, workplaces.

This abstract has been viewed 1952 times since 2-May-2016.

   
 

   CONTACT US | COPYRIGHT AND DISCLAIMER | ADMIN ONLY