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Original Research

Lungurra Ngoora - a pilot model of care for aged and disabled in a remote Aboriginal community – can it work?

Submitted: 31 January 2012
Revised: 8 September 2012
Published: 24 December 2012

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Author(s) : LoGiudice DC, Smith K, Shadforth G, Lindeman M, Carroll E, Atkinson D, Schaper F, Lautenschlager N, Murphy R, Flicker L.

Melissa Lindeman

Citation: LoGiudice DC, Smith K, Shadforth G, Lindeman M, Carroll E, Atkinson D, Schaper F, Lautenschlager N, Murphy R, Flicker L.  Lungurra Ngoora - a pilot model of care for aged and disabled in a remote Aboriginal community – can it work? Rural and Remote Health 12: 2078. (Online) 2012. Available: http://www.rrh.org.au

ABSTRACT

Introduction:  The literature on the health of and services for older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations is relatively sparse. This study explored the development and implementation of a locally designed community service model of care for older people, and people with disability and/or mental health problems in remote Aboriginal Australia.
Methods:  Based on extensive community consultation with older people, families, carers, community members and stakeholders, a model of care was developed to address unmet needs for the target population and their carers in the remote community of Looma, in the Kimberley region of Australia. The model was implemented and evaluated over 12 months. The main outcome measures included the number of services (including home services, meals, transport, respite, personal care and advocacy) provided. Outcomes of community participation, capacity building, resources, partnerships, workforce, service delivery and cultural protection were assessed qualitatively by an external evaluator. 
Results:  The number of people receiving community care services in Looma increased from eight to 22, and services increased in all domains from 140 total services delivered for 1 month at baseline to 2356 by the final month of the program.
Conclusions:  The Lungurra Ngoora community care service model pilot project demonstrated a successful collaborative service model that addressed the care needs of older persons, those with disability and mental illness, and their carers in this remote community. The developmental approach, and model structure, could serve as a template for future delivery of services in remote Aboriginal communities.

Key words: Aboriginal, aged, Australia, dementia, disability, health services research.

This abstract has been viewed 1668 times since 24-Dec-2012.

   
 

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