Rural and Remote Health Journal photo
African section Asian section Australasian section European section Latin American section North American section
home
login/register
current articles

contribute
information for authors
status/user profile
links/forums
about us

Original Research

Factors affecting healthcare service utilization of mothers who had children with diarrhea in Ethiopia: evidence from a population based national survey

Submitted: 10 February 2015
Revised: 14 November 2015
Accepted: 14 November 2015
Published: 24 December 2015

Full text: You can view the full article, or view a printable version.
Comments: (login to access the comments on this article)

Author(s) : Azage M, Haile D.

Citation: Azage M, Haile D.  Factors affecting healthcare service utilization of mothers who had children with diarrhea in Ethiopia: evidence from a population based national survey. Rural and Remote Health (Internet) 2015; 15: 3493. Available: http://www.rrh.org.au/articles/subviewnew.asp?ArticleID=3493 (Accessed 27 June 2016)

ABSTRACT

Introduction:  Appropriate healthcare-seeking practices of mothers are important to prevent child death. This study aimed to investigate factors associated with mothers’ healthcare services utilization for managing childhood diarrhea (CDD) in Ethiopia.
Methods:  A secondary data analysis was performed using data from the Ethiopian Demographic and Health Survey 2011. Binary and multivariable logistic regressions were carried out to identify factors associated with mothers’ healthcare services utilization for CDD.
Results: About 35% (95% confidence interval (CI): 32.67–37.33%) of mothers visited healthcare institutions (HCIs) for CDD. Those mothers with children aged 6–11 months were 2.16 times more likely to use HCIs for CDD (adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=2.16, 95%CI: 1.32–3.53) compared to mothers who had children under 6 months of age. Urban mothers were 1.68 times more likely to use HCIs for CDD compared to rural mothers (AOR=1.68, 95%CI: 1.06–2.67). Those mothers who had information about oral rehydration salts (ORSs) were 2.66 times more likely to use HCIs for CDD compared to those mothers who had no information about ORS (AOR=2.66, 95%CI: 1.93–3.67). Mothers who attended antenatal care were 1.34 times more likely to use HCIs for CDD than mothers who never attended antenatal care (AOR=1.34, 95%CI: 1.04–1.74). Mothers who had postnatal checkups were 1.53 times more likely to use HCIs for CDD compared to mothers who had no postnatal checkups (AOR=1.53, 95%CI: 1.02–2.30). Those mothers who participated in community conversation were 1.67 times more likely to use HCIs for CDD than those mothers who had no information about community conversation (AOR=1.67, 95%CI: 1.15–2.39).
Conclusions:  Healthcare services utilization for CDD was found to be poor in Ethiopia. Urban residency, older age of the child, awareness of ORSs, antenatal care attendance, postnatal check and attending community conversation were factors associated with healthcare services utilization for CDD. Interventions to improve mothers’ healthcare service utilization for CDD treatment should target rural households. Promotions of appropriate CDD treatment during ANC, postnatal checkup and community conversation are the recommended interventions.

Key words: children, diarrhea, Ethiopia, healthcare utilization, oral rehydration salt.

This abstract has been viewed 902 times since 24-Dec-2015.

   
 

   CONTACT US | COPYRIGHT AND DISCLAIMER | ADMIN ONLY