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Review Article

The conducting and reporting of rural health research: rurality and rural population issues

Submitted: 31 March 2005
Revised: 4 August 2005
Published: 14 October 2005

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Author(s) : Robinson A, Burley M, McGrail MR, Drysdale M, Jones R, Rickard CM.

Anske RobinsonMollie BurleyMatthew McGrailMarlene DrysdaleRebecca JonesClaire Rickard

Citation: Robinson A, Burley M, McGrail MR, Drysdale M, Jones R, Rickard CM.  The conducting and reporting of rural health research: rurality and rural population issues. Rural and Remote Health 5: 427. (Online) 2005. Available: http://www.rrh.org.au

ABSTRACT

Rurality and rural population issues require consideration when conducting and reporting on rural health research. A first article focused on the planning stage of the research. The objective of this article is to explore conducting and reporting issues that require attention when undertaking rural health research. The privacy of participants, the collection of data, the cultural traditions of Indigenous communities, the dissemination of results, and giving something back to the community, are all aspects of conducting and reporting rural health research that require attention. Procedures such as identifying the characteristics of the population, attention to safety issues when collecting data, the use of local liaison persons and acknowledging the ownership of intellectual property, increase the quality of the research outcomes. They are issues that are relevant to both qualitative and quantitative research methods. Procedures are available to address issues of particular concern in developing appropriate methods for rural health research. While we have concentrated on Australian issues, and possible solutions, rural localities in many other countries may face similar issues. In any rural setting, paying attention to issues that may affect the conducting and reporting of rural health research will hopefully result in studies that support the continued improvement of health in rural communities.

Keywords: qualitative research, quantitative research, research methods, rural research.

This abstract has been viewed 3207 times since 14-Oct-2005.

   
 

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