Original Research

Distribution of child health indicators according to internal migration and various social variables in Turkey

AUTHORS

Gulcan Santas1 Dr *

Mehmet Ali Eryurt2 Associate Professor

AFFILIATIONS

1 Health Management, Yozgat Bozok University, Turkey

2 Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey

ACCEPTED: 29 October 2019


early abstract:

Background: Birth weight, stunting and overweight / obesity of children are among the most important child health indicators which cause concerns all over the world. Based on international literature findings, birth weight, stunting and overweight / obesity of children may differ according to the various socio-demographic and socio-economic factors. In addition, migration status of women and their children (urban, rural, urban to rural, rural to urban) may influence the birth outcomes and health status of children under five years.

Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the distribution of internal migration and the socio-demographic and socio-economic factors on birth weight, stunting and overweight / obesity in children under five years of age in Turkey. Another purpose of this study is to investigate the course of birth weight, stunting and overweight / obesity in children by years in Turkey.

Methods: The source of data for this study was the nationally representative five Turkey Demographic and Health Surveys (1993-1998-2003-2008-2013 TNSA). Turkey Demographic and Health Survey was conducted by Hacettepe University Institute of Population Studies. Logistic regression analysis was used in order to determine the impact of migration status, socio-demographic and socio-economic factors on birth weight, stunting and overweight / obesity of children.

Results: As a result of the study, the inadequate birth weight was found higher in children living in rural areas and children migrated from urban areas to rural areas compared to children living in urban areas. Stunting were found to be higher in rural areas and urban to rural areas compared to the urban areas. Unlike birth weight and stunting in children, oweight / obesity was higher in children living in urban areas compared to children living in rural areas. Moreover, it was revealed that socio-demographic (maternal education, birth order, receiving prenatal care, age, gender) and socio-economic factors (residential area and childhood residential area) affected the birth weight, stunting and overweight / obesity of children in this study.

Conclusions: There is a need for concrete steps of policy-makers to overcome the regional disparities that create disadvantages for children under five years of age in disadvantaged areas.