Review Article

Experiences of rural and remote nurses during and following disasters: a scoping review

AUTHORS

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Catherine Anne Brewer1
GCertEmergNurs, Registered Nurse *

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Jamie Ranse2
PhD, Associate Professor

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Karen Hammad3
PhD, Clinical Management Consultant

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Alison Hutton4
PhD, Professor

AFFILIATIONS

1 School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia

2 Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia; and Department of Emergency Medicine, Gold Coast Health, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia

3 Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia; and College of Nursing and Midwifery, Flinders University, South Australia, Australia

4 School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia; College of Nursing and Midwifery, Flinders University, South Australia, Australia; and School of Nursing, Johns Hopkins, Maryland, USA

ACCEPTED: 1 September 2022


early abstract:

Aim: The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the literature regarding the experiences of rural and remote nurses during and following disasters.
Background: Disasters affect all areas of the globe. Rural and remote nurses are often involved in disaster response. These nurses are faced with unique challenges in their daily practice due to geographical isolation and reduced resources. Nurses roles and experiences in times of disaster have been discussed in the past, however in the setting of rural and remote areas, it remains largely under-reported.
Method: This scoping review was guided by Arksey and O’Malley’s methodological framework for scoping reviews. Electronic databases CINHAL, MEDLINE, Scopus, Cochrane, Joanna Briggs Institute, Embase were searched. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Extension for Scoping Reviews (PRISMA-ScR) Checklist was used to guide the reporting of this review. Key concepts and themes were identified using Braun and Clarkes six step framework for thematic analysis.
Results: Eight articles met the inclusion criteria for this review. Themes that were identified included disaster roles, pre-disaster preparations, psychological and emotional states, and community involvement and relationships.
Conclusions: Minimal literature exists that explores what rural and remote nurses experience in times of disaster. In this review, the experience of rural and remote nurses included the relationships between their personal and professional obligations and the influence this has on nurses ability to respond to disasters. Further research is required in this domain to better understand the phenomena and address knowledge gaps that exists in the existing literature.